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Thread: Can i stack CLD

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    Can i stack CLD

    Got a new car and its got some shitty no name CLD all over the damn thing. Its sticky as fuck and legit do not want to take it all off. Is there anything inherently wrong with putting better CLD ontop of it?

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    Owner BigAl205's Avatar
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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    It depends on what you mean by "shitty". Is it sticking well to the metal, or is it coming apart? Can you tell if it's butyl or asphalt-based?

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    No you can't. It's all about how the CLD interacts with the panel it's attached to.

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    Quote Originally Posted by Theslaking View Post
    No you can't. It's all about how the CLD interacts with the panel it's attached to.
    im somewhat on the fence, to me the constrained layer is being made further away from the metal, as long as it’s stuck well, you can effectively make a structure stiffer and more resistant to vibration by increasing substrate layer and moving the foil further away from the panel, as long as the under layer is not soft as hell it will definitely not be worse, it’s basic engineering...

    how does thicker cld work potentially better (they do 4mm and two mm of various brands... it all depends how shitty the first layer is... so I won’t say it won’t work, it’s a case by case situation

    I think I’d use the on site info... as in assess it in person rather than ask people who aren’t there

    more layers of deadener does do more... it just doesn’t have the same value for money as the first layer...

    I would challenge anyone to apply a single layer of dynamat extreme and then add a second and say the second layer did nothing! If I’m adding extra layers in trouble spots I tend to stagger the joints so it adds rigidity where the constrained layer is broken if that makes sense, even if it’s just adding weight it serves a purpose, however it definitely won’t do nothing

    but that’s two layers of the same, it all depends on the first layer, of it’s bad it’s gonna be fun getting it off

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    We did it in spl vehicles with no measurable gain. I don't remember everything but I know we seen a big difference from none to 1 layer and next to no difference from 1 to 2 (and 3 in spots) layers. We did have a small difference from half to full coverage. We were only doing lower frequency sweeps chasing db's but the conclusion was it was a waste of time and money. I wish I could remember details but that was the early 2000's.

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    We need to get Skizer in on this. He just did all this research scientifically a year ago.

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    I found this old thread. Seems like layer 1 does most the work. Layer 2 does help tho.

    https://www.diymobileaudio.com/threa...niques.262722/

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    DIYMA Janitor SkizeR's Avatar
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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    Of course you *can* stack em. But, it doesn't do much. On important areas i would just do it right and remove it to start fresh. Think doors, rear deck, roof, quarter panels, etc.. Areas like the floor, and other strong/non-resonant parts i would just leave. When you stack layers all you are doing is adding mass. At that point you might as well just glue lead to the old deadener. Its not very efficient. Yes it does *something*, but don't pay much attention to those old school guys that swear by 3 layers. Thats because they use shit deadener thats hardly a constraining layer damper in the first place



    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    Quote Originally Posted by Theslaking View Post
    We did it in spl vehicles with no measurable gain. I don't remember everything but I know we seen a big difference from none to 1 layer and next to no difference from 1 to 2 (and 3 in spots) layers. We did have a small difference from half to full coverage. We were only doing lower frequency sweeps chasing db's but the conclusion was it was a waste of time and money. I wish I could remember details but that was the early 2000's.
    Different application, you were looking to control resonances and make them favourable for the frequency you wanted to play, I’d put money on it we did more testing than you did with spl and deadener, tuning a door skin to a certain frequency for example, or a roof... it all helped and some areas needed 2 layers to get resonances down further and tune the skin slightly differently, it’s far from as simple as applying a single layer everywhere and testing and then applying a double layer everywhere and testing, wed have six sets of doors with different layers and combinations of deadener thickness as an example

    we gained 0.1db by adjusting how the heater box sat on the bulkhead under the bonnet as an example of how anal we were, but I digress... your response is like saying sticky tyres don’t help you go faster round a track because I tested them on gravel roads in the countryside and they didn’t do any better than stock, different situation and different requirements
    Last edited by dumdum; 4 Days Ago at 02:32 AM.

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    Re: Can i stack CLD

    Quote Originally Posted by dumdum View Post
    Different application, you were looking to control resonances and make them favourable for the frequency you wanted to play.
    That's why I put that disclaimer.

    Quote Originally Posted by dumdum View Post
    I'd put money on it we did more testing than you did with spl and deadener
    I didn't catch where you said you did testing? You got actual results? I just seen where made a suggestion that someone else should and would see positive results.

    Your tire analogy is not good here. 2000 hz and down (or whatever it was exactly) is part of the audio spectrum we are trying to play in a car. So your only talking higher frequency?

    We got pretty serious with testing. Like flipping cupholders and packing the glovebox with papers to see if it changes things. However we didn't do a sweep to see if we still had a peak at 3200. So yeah I might have missed positive results with thinks like that.

    I would be interested in your testing results. I just don't believe it would make enough difference to justify effort and cost even for the avid enthusiast. Nothing bracing panels couldn't do anyways.

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