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Thread: Water analogy

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    Question Water analogy

    Calculator - http://www.caraudiojunkies.com/showt...Law-calculator

    http://www.mcsquared.com/ohmframe.htm <<< volts equals amperes times resistance [ 0hm's Law - Georg Ohm ]

    PSI 1] Pressure ] volts
    GPM 2] Rate of Flow ] amperes
    Size of pipe 3] Resistance ] ohms

    If you throw a glass of water on something or if you throw a gallon of water on something or if you dump a 30 gallon garbage can of water on something [ < this is what we want < ]

    for a big "H I T" of sub bass , we need to increase current in amperes by decreasing resistance in 0hms [ i.e. maximum current / minimum resistance ]

    Dual Voice coils can either be run in series or parallel [ parallel lowers resistance ]

    A high current amplifier is desirable [ maximum flow rate with minimum resistance to flow ]

    i.e. A dual 1 ohm driver can be wired @ 0.5 ohms [ one half ohm final impedance/resistance ]

    If the amplifier you have is " 1 ohm stable " versus say: makes it's power/watts into 4 0hms or 2 0hm stable it may handle more current.

    [ dropping a 10 pound weight into deep water from 20 feet up will make more splash than dropping a 1 pound weight into a wading pool from 4 feet up ]

    Thee early bird gets the worm, the 2nd mouse gets the cheese and 2nd place is the first loser.

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    Re: Water analogy

    I tried to simplify some concept that @ times seems confusing.
    Thee early bird gets the worm, the 2nd mouse gets the cheese and 2nd place is the first loser.

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    Senior Member Euphonic's Avatar
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    Re: Water analogy

    I understand what you're saying, but 400 watts from a high current amp isn't better than 400 watts from a high voltage amp.

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    Re: Water analogy

    HV, like (Linear Power) amps do great . . . JL Audio are good choices . . . But, as pressure / volts drop more current flows. A HC amp is designed for more gallons per minute / flow / current, filling a pool with a garden hose takes time, a fire hose does it quicker.
    With a high current (Sundown mono)amp I got the most comments , on a Digital Design G model 1 ohm DVC in a sealed 5/8 inch thick subwoofer enclosure , when it was wired in parallel ( half ohm). Someone on a forum even figured out that a working knowledge of T/S parameters and a box building program plus several years of designing enclosures would be needed, as DD only gives specs for ported enclosures.

    Most HV amps do great until voltage drops to 9 v or 8 v
    Thee early bird gets the worm, the 2nd mouse gets the cheese and 2nd place is the first loser.

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    Senior Member Euphonic's Avatar
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    Re: Water analogy

    Quote Originally Posted by Hic View Post
    A HC amp is designed for more gallons per minute / flow / current, filling a pool with a garden hose takes time, a fire hose does it quicker.
    If you unhook the garden hose from your house spigot and attach a fire hose instead, the pool doesn't fill any quicker because the pressure (voltage) didn't increase.

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    Re: Water analogy

    Very True !

    Without a fire hydrant to move the water . . .

    Probably would not hurt to beef up the electrical system in your vehicle. (battery, alternator, stiffening capacitor, et cetera )
    Last edited by Hic; 1 Week Ago at 11:46 AM.
    Thee early bird gets the worm, the 2nd mouse gets the cheese and 2nd place is the first loser.

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    Re: Water analogy

    Quote Originally Posted by Euphonic View Post
    If you unhook the garden hose from your house spigot and attach a fire hose instead, the pool doesn't fill any quicker because the pressure (voltage) didn't increase.
    While I'm certainly no expert in plumbing (or electronics), I think it would depend on a number of factors; chiefly, house plumbing I.D., and garden hose I.D. and length. For example, replacing our 2 x 50' x 5/8" I.D. garden hose with a 100' large diameter fire hose would significantly increase the flow rate at my house (given our 3/4" feed to hose bib), due to reduced restriction/friction loss (resistance).

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    Re: Water analogy

    cost analysis is over-riding factor H E R E !
    If the amplifier you have is " 1 ohm stable " versus say: makes it's power/watts into 4 0hms or 2 0hm stable it may handle more current.
    Is it preferable to buy a less costly amp and then try to wire it bridged into 2 ohms ? does seeing a protect light alarm you ? is going without subbass or all music in the case of a 5-channwl amp worth it ? will paying the cost of repair , when compared to a slightly more expensive amp that is designed to run @ lower ohmage seem beneficial ro rhose who like to have "chest crushing" notes everyday.

    If a month of downtimw does not concern you . . . save a few bucks and buy the amp with the biggest number on the case as opposed to an amplifier that cost nearly twice as much , if not 3 times more , but only claim to make 12.5 watts into 2 channels in the case of an LP 2.2 HV . Zuki Eleet amps claim 5 watts into 4 channels .

    Do what everyone is doing, or figure out your own path to bliss !
    Thee early bird gets the worm, the 2nd mouse gets the cheese and 2nd place is the first loser.

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    Senior Member Euphonic's Avatar
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    Re: Water analogy

    Quote Originally Posted by Grinder View Post
    While I'm certainly no expert in plumbing (or electronics), I think it would depend on a number of factors; chiefly, house plumbing I.D., and garden hose I.D. and length. For example, replacing our 2 x 50' x 5/8" I.D. garden hose with a 100' large diameter fire hose would significantly increase the flow rate at my house (given our 3/4" feed to hose bib), due to reduced restriction/friction loss (resistance).
    And yet it will never flow as much as a fire hydrant because the supply line is still smaller than the fire hose. The one thing people tend to forget is that speakers are not a resistive load, they're reactive. Imagine that you have an hour to fill the pool, but trying to figure out how with a constantly changing hose size.

    Many years ago, I helped put together a demo vehicle for a store that would hit the occasional show. The subwoofer system consisted of 6-Rockford Fosgate Punch 225.2 amps powering 12-Rockford Fosgate Punch DVC subwoofers. Originally, each sub was wired in series, then paralleled as a pair, and bridged on each amp. (Each amp now "seeing" a 4-ohm bridged load.) After a bit of testing it for SPL, we decided to try running all the coils in parallel just to see if the results changed. (Each amp now "seeing" a 1-ohm bridged load, which is not suggested by Rockford Fosgate.) The SPL increased a bit and the amps would run with music just fine. The downside was that when you'd play a sine sweep at high volume, you could watch 300 amp fuses turn colors before your eyes up until the point where they popped. At the target SPL frequency though, there were zero problems. After consulting with some technical guys, we were told that with the subs in the sealed enclosure they were in and the frequency we were using that the amps were actually "seeing" a 2.8-ohm bridged load during SPL runs. Whether or not they were accurate, I have no idea, that was 20ish year ago. What I do know is that it never came close to popping any fuses or putting any of the amps into protect, so maybe the tech guys were right. If they were right and we were running HC amps instead of HV amps, I can only guess that we would have been leaving power on the table.




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    Re: Water analogy

    Quote Originally Posted by Euphonic View Post
    And yet it will never flow as much as a fire hydrant because the supply line is still smaller than the fire hose. The one thing people tend to forget is that speakers are not a resistive load, they're reactive. Imagine that you have an hour to fill the pool, but trying to figure out how with a constantly changing hose size.

    Many years ago, I helped put together a demo vehicle for a store that would hit the occasional show. The subwoofer system consisted of 6-Rockford Fosgate Punch 225.2 amps powering 12-Rockford Fosgate Punch DVC subwoofers. Originally, each sub was wired in series, then paralleled as a pair, and bridged on each amp. (Each amp now "seeing" a 4-ohm bridged load.) After a bit of testing it for SPL, we decided to try running all the coils in parallel just to see if the results changed. (Each amp now "seeing" a 1-ohm bridged load, which is not suggested by Rockford Fosgate.) The SPL increased a bit and the amps would run with music just fine. The downside was that when you'd play a sine sweep at high volume, you could watch 300 amp fuses turn colors before your eyes up until the point where they popped. At the target SPL frequency though, there were zero problems. After consulting with some technical guys, we were told that with the subs in the sealed enclosure they were in and the frequency we were using that the amps were actually "seeing" a 2.8-ohm bridged load during SPL runs. Whether or not they were accurate, I have no idea, that was 20ish year ago. What I do know is that it never came close to popping any fuses or putting any of the amps into protect, so maybe the tech guys were right. If they were right and we were running HC amps instead of HV amps, I can only guess that we would have been leaving power on the table.



    Yes. I get that. My comment was simply to address your flawed garden hose/fire hose/swimming pool analogy. I only added "resistance" in reference the water analogy, which is widely used as a rudimentary representation of Ohms Law.

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